AFRMA

American Fancy Rat & Mouse Association

AFRMA Fancy Mice - Varieties

The following is a brief description of the mouse Varieties as recognized by the American Fancy Rat and Mouse Association. For complete details of these Standards including points, faults, and disqualifications, please refer to the AFRMA Show Regulations & Standards book.

For complete details of these Standards including points, faults, and disqualifications, please refer to the AFRMA Show Regulations & Standards book.

Note: The pictures on this page are not meant to be true representatives of the animal’s color. Because of differences in monitors (CRT/LCD) and how the monitor is adjusted, the colors may be different. Seeing in person is always best.

STANDARD - The coat to be smooth and glossy, and feel fine to the hand. It should show a natural high shine and densly cover the body, including the belly, groin, area around the front legs, and behind the ears. Color to conform to a recognized color or pattern.

Pink-Eyed White Standard mice owned and bred by Nancy Ferris. Photo ©1997 Craig Robbins.
Standard mice
SATIN - Satin mice may be shown in any recognized color or markings. The ideal coat has a unique and distinct appearance with its lustrous sheen. The hair should be very fine, dense, soft, and silky to the touch.

Pink-Eyed White Satin mouse owned and bred by Karen Robbins. Photo ©1997 Craig Robbins.

Research article:
“The Winged Helix/Forkhead Transcription Factor Foxq1 Regulates Differentiation of Hair in Satin Mice.”
Satin mouse
LONG HAIR - Long Hair mice may be shown in any recognized color or markings. The coat should be as long as possible, but combined with density, and is to be fine and silky in texture.

Pink-Eyed White Long Hair mouse owned by Nichole Royer. Photo ©1996 Craig Robbins.
Long Hair mouse
LONG HAIR SATIN - Long Hair Satin mice may be shown in any recognized color or markings. The coat should be as long as possible, but combined with density, and is to have the distinctive sheen of the satin.

Blue Long Hair Satin mouse owned by Mary Sheridan. Photo ©1984 AFRMA.
Long Hair Satin mouse
FRIZZIE - Frizzie mice may be shown in any recognized color or markings. The coat should be tightly waved or frizzed over the entire body, very dense, with guard hairs of somewhat harsh texture, protruding slightly beyond the normal length of coat. This is more pronounced in young mice, and should not influence the placement. Frizzies may also be long haired. Whiskers are to be curly. Frizzie mice are normally cobbier in body type.

Black Tan Frizzie kitten mouse owned and bred by Norah Hobgood. Photo ©2009 Karen Robbins.
Frizzie mouse
FRIZZIE SATIN - Frizzie Satin mice may be shown in any recognized color or markings. The coat should be tightly waved or frizzed over the entire body as with the Frizzie, and should also have the distinctive satin sheen. Frizzie Satin mice may also be long haired. Whiskers are to be curly.

Fawn Frizzie Satin mouse owned by Michelle Collie. Photo ©1996 Craig Robbins.
Frizzie Satin mouse
HAIRLESS - Hairless mice should have a thin, bright, rather translucent skin, free of scars or pimples, and be as hairless as possible. The skin may be of any color or recognized marking, and wrinkling should not be penalized. The eyes may be of any color, but should be bright and free from any problems. The ears should be very large and wrinkle free. The toenails should be short (clipped if necessary). The whiskers may be very short or missing.

Hairless mouse owned by Meg Hurley. Photo ©2005 Karen Robbins.
Hairless mouse

For complete details of the Standards including points, faults, eliminations, and disqualifications, please refer to the AFRMA Show Regulations & Standards book.

Purchase the AFRMA Official Color Standards Mouse book.

Updated January 16, 2014